La.cinquieme.République

De la politique pure et affaires étrangeres
 
AccueilAccueil  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:15

Le Spleen de Paris, also known as Paris Spleen or Petits Poèmes en prose, is a collection of 51 short prose poems by Charles Baudelaire. The collection was published posthumously in 1869 and is associated with the modernist literary movement.

Baudelaire mentions he had read Aloysius Bertrand's Gaspard de la nuit (considered the first example of prose poetry) at least twenty times before starting this work. Though inspired by Bertrand, Baudelaire's prose poems were based on Parisian contemporary life instead of the medieval background which Bertrand employed. He told about his work: "These are the flowers of evil again, but with more freedom, much more detail, and much more mockery." Indeed, many of the themes and even titles from Baudelaire's earlier collection Les Fleurs du mal are revisited in this work.

These poems have no particular order, have no beginning and no end and they can be read like thoughts or short stories in a stream of consciousness style. The point of the poems is "to capture the beauty of life in the modern city," using what Jean-Paul Sartre has labeled as being his existential outlook on his surroundings.

Published twenty years after the fratricidal June Days that ended the ideal or "brotherly" revolution of 1848, Baudelaire makes no attempts at trying to reform society he has grown up in but realizes the inequities of the progressing modernization of Paris. In poems such as "The Eyes of the Poor" where he writes (after witnessing an impoverished family looking in on a new cafe): "Not only was I moved by that family of eyes, but I felt a little ashamed of our glasses and decanters, larger than our thirst...", showing his feelings of despair and class guilt.

The title of the work refers not to the abdominal organ (the spleen) but rather to the second, more literary meaning of the word, "melancholy with no apparent cause, characterised by a disgust with everything".

Pleasure

Le Spleen de Paris explores the idea of pleasure as a vehicle for expressing emotion. Many of the poems refer to sex or sin explicitly (i.e. "Double Bedroom," "A Hemisphere in a Head of Hair", "Temptations"); others use subtle language and imagery to evoke sensuality (i.e. "the Artist’s Confiteor"). In both cases, the diction is undeniably sexual; for example, in "Double Bedroom," “Muslin rains abundantly over the windows and around the bed in a snowy cascade. Within this bed is ensconced the Idol, queen of dreams.”[2] Baudelaire’s obsession with pleasure reflects his love for scandal and wickedness, as well as his philosophy that by seeking pleasure, man taps into his authentic “evil” self.[3]
Sobriety and intoxication

Many of Baudelaire’s prose poems openly advocate drinking and intoxication, such as "Be Drunk." Intoxication (or any equal pleasure such as creative work, sex, virtue, etc.) creates a euphoria and timelessness that allows you to transcend the limitations of time and truly live "in the moment." In "Be Drunk," the speaker commands the reader to engage in something intoxicating: "You must be drunk always... Time crushes your shoulders and bends you earthward, you must be drunk without respite."[4] Sobriety, in contrast, forces you to address the harsh realities of the world around you. However, this interpretation has recently been challenged by some critics, who claim that Baudelaire was actually being ironic in his advocacy for drunkenness. Maria Scott, a literary scholar, claims that Baudelaire believed "artificial toxication was... far inferior to 'successive work' and the 'regular exercise of will,' that artificial stimulants... actually amplify time."[5] Thus, it is debatable whether intoxication refers to literal drunkenness as an escape or if symbolizes the pleasure found in writing and expressing oneself.
The artist/poet

In Le Spleen de Paris, the concept of artist and poet intermingle. Baudelaire saw poetry as a form of art, and thus in many of the prose poems the artist is a substitute for a traditional poet or speaker. In "the Desire to Paint," the artist attempts to depict his beautiful muse with images, just as the poet attempts to express his emotions with language. The relationship between the artist and poet reflects the need to evoke a particular feeling or idea, and this thread is carried through almost every single poem in the text. Ultimately, the artist and the poet become one, since they share the same purpose - to describe beauty. In this sense, the work itself (and every individual poem within) is beautiful, a "work of art" due to its innovative, interesting form. Thus, the poem, according to Baudelaire, is as much an "aesthetic experience" as it is a literary one.[6]
Women

Women are both admired and ridiculed in Le Spleen de Paris. Some poems, such as "the Desire to Paint," reflect female power and sexuality in a somewhat positive manner. However, a larger portion of the poems in Baudelaire's work debase women as evil, gaudy, and cold. Many are represented as prostitutes, and according to scholars, "the courtesan would seem to be a virtual incarnation, for Baudelaire, of all that is artificial and misleading."[7] In "the Rope," the speaker's apprentice hangs himself, and his mother comes to collect the rope. The speaker is shocked to discover that she did so not to "preserve them as horrible and precious relics," but to sell them for a morbid profit.[8] Baudelaire rejects the concept of maternal love and replaces it with a cold economic reality. Still, women are inherently sexual, and in some regards, Baudelaire admires their sensual beauty (connects back to themes of intoxication, pleasure).
Mortality and the passage of time

Many of Baudelaire's prose poems are dominated by the concept of time, usually negatively. The speaker in Le Spleen de Paris fears the passage of time and his/her own mortality. As a result, intoxication, women, pleasure, and writing are all forms of escape from this unavoidable hell. "Be Drunk" and "Already!" exemplify Baudelaire's infatuation with the idea of time. In "Already!" the speaker is incapable of matching the infiniteness and simplicity of nature, and at the end, comes face to face with his own death: "I felt pulled down deathwards; which is why, when companions said, 'At last!' I could only cry, 'Already!"[9] Also, this theme supports Baudelaire's admiration of art and poetry because although man cannot defeat time and death, a work of art can. Art, poetry, life, and death are inextricably linked within Baudelaire's poems, and perhaps reflect a personal obsession with mortality.
The city

For Baudelaire, the setting of most poems within Le Spleen de Paris is the Parisian metropolis, specifically the poorer areas within the city. Notable poems within Le Spleen de Paris whose urban setting is important include “Crowds” and “The Old Mountebank.” Within his writing about city life, Baudelaire seems to stress the relationship between individual and society, frequently placing the speaker in a reflective role looking out at the city. It is also important to note that Baudelaire’s Paris is not one of nice shops and beautiful streets. Instead, Baudelaire focuses on dirty, poverty-stricken areas of Paris with social problems rather than the Paris of the upper class.
Poverty/class

In connection with the theme of the Parisian metropolis, Baudelaire focuses heavily on the theme of poverty and social class within Le Spleen de Paris. Important poems from the collection which embody these themes include “The Toy of the Poor,” “The Eyes of the Poor,” “Counterfeit Money,” and “Let’s Beat Up the Poor.” In these poems Baudelaire introduces slightly differing views of the urban poor. In “The Toy of the Poor” Baudelaire heavily stresses the need for equality between social classes in Paris. In comparison, “Counterfeit Money” and “Let’s Beat Up the Poor” seem to use a sarcastic tone to instil empathy in the reader for those people in poverty. In Michael Hamburger’s introduction to his translation, Twenty Prose Poems of Baudelaire, the scholar notes a highly sympathetic view of the poor in Le Spleen de Paris. Baudelaire seems to relate to the poor and becomes an advocate for them in his poetry.
Religion/good vs. evil

Many poems in Le Spleen de Paris incorporate a central theme of religion or the relationship between good and evil in human nature. “Cake,” which centers on a moral battle addressing the question of whether humans are inherently good or evil stands out as an especially important poem within the collection. “Loss of a Halo” also incorporates similar themes, literally discussing the role of angels as well as the relationship between mankind and religious ideology, questioning the goodness of Christian ideals. Along these lines, Baudelaire repeatedly addresses the theme of sin within his poetry as well as questioning how the hierarchy of class could affect the hierarchy of goodness, implying that those of higher social class tend not to be morally superior to those of lower classes. Many critics of Baudelaire address the prominent role of religion in the poet’s life and how that might have affected his writing. Some suspect that since Baudelaire internalized Christian practices, he thought himself capable of accurately portraying God in his writing. Yet by representing God’s message within his poetry, Baudelaire placed himself in a position of patriarchal authority, similar to that of the God depicted in Christianity.
Poet/reader relationship

The following passage is taken from the preface to the 2008 Mackenzie translation of Le Spleen de Paris, entitled “To Arsène Houssaye”

My dear friend, I send you here a little work of which no one could say that it has neither head nor tail, because, on the contrary, everything in it is both head and tail, alternately and reciprocally. Please consider what fine advantages this combination offers to all of us, to you, to me, and to the reader. We can cut whatever we like—me, my reverie, you, the manuscript, and the reader, his reading; for I don’t tie the impatient reader up in the endless thread of a superfluous plot. Pull out one of the vertebrae, and the two halves of this tortuous fantasy will rejoin themselves painlessly. Chop it up into numerous fragments, and you’ll find that each one can live on its own. In the hopes that some of these stumps will be lively enough to please and amuse you, I dedicate the entire serpent to you. (Mackenzie 3)

While writing Le Spleen de Paris, Baudelaire made very conscious decisions regarding his relationship with his readers. As seen in the preface to the collection, addressed to his publisher, Arsène Houssaye, Baudelaire attempted to write a text that was very accessible to a reader while pulling the most appealing aspects of both prose and poetry and combining them into the revolutionary genre of prose poetry. For Baudelaire, the accessibility of the text and ability for a reader to set down the book and pick it up much later was crucial, especially considering his implied opinions of his readers. Baudelaire’s tone throughout the preface, “The Dog and the Vial” as well as other poems throughout Le Spleen de Paris seem to illustrate Baudelaire’s opinions of superiority over his readers. In “The Dog and the Vial,” a man offers his dog a vial of fancy perfume to smell and the dog reacts in horror, instead wishing to sniff more seemingly unappealing smells, specifically excrement. The poem concludes with the frustration of the speaker with his dog, expressed as the speaker states: “In this respect you, unworthy companion of my sad life, resemble the public, to whom one must never present the delicate scents that only exasperate them, but instead give them only dung, chosen with care” (Mackenzie 14). One can extrapolate this poem to apply more figuratively to the larger themes of the poet-reader relationship, in which Baudelaire deprecates his readers, viewing them as unintelligent and incapable of appreciating his work.
Style

Le Spleen de Paris represents a definitive break from traditional poetic forms. The text is composed of "prose poems," which span the continuum between "prosaic" and "poetic" works. The new, unconventional form of poetry was characteristic of the modernist movement occurring throughout Europe (and particularly in Paris) at the time.[10] In the preface to Le Spleen de Paris, Baudelaire describes that modernity requires a new language, "a miracle of a poetic prose, musical without rhythm or rhyme, supple enough and striking enough to suit lyrical movements of the soul, undulations of reverie, the flip-flops of consciousness," and in this sense, Le Spleen de Paris gives life to modern language.[11] Baudelaire's prose poetry tends to be more poetic in comparison to later works such as Ponge's Le parti pris des choses, but each poem varies. For an example of a more poetic poem, see "Evening Twilight"; for a prosaic example, see "The Bad Glazier."
Publication history, influences, and critical reception

Baudelaire’s Le Spleen de Paris is unique in that it was published posthumously by his sister in 1869, two years after Baudelaire died. In fact, it was not until his waning years, plagued by physical ailments and the contraction of syphilis that he created a table of contents for the book. Baudelaire spent years 1857-1867 working on his book of poems that chronicled daily life in the city of Paris. These poems aimed at capturing the times in which they were written, from the brutally repressed upheavals of 1848 (after which the government censored literature more than ever), the 1851 coup d’état of Louis Bonaparte and generally Paris of the 1850s, demolished and renovated by Napoleon III’s prefect, Baron Haussman. In displaying the social antagonisms of the age, Baudelaire drew influence from many great artists of the time. In fact, an active critical essayist himself, his critical reviews of other poets “elucidate the recesses of the mind that created Les Fleurs du Mal and Le Spleen de Paris.”

Influence: While there is much speculation regarding direct influence and inspiration in the creation of Le Spleen de Paris, the following colleagues seem to have clearly influenced the book of small poems:

Edgar Allan Poe: “Indeed, Poe illustrates his claim with several examples which seem to summarize with uncanny precision the temperament of Baudelaire himself (Poe 273-4). The affinity between the two writers in this regard seems beyond dispute…Moreover, ‘Le Démon de la perversité is less a tale than a prose poem, and both its subject-matter and its movement from general considerations to specific examples leading to an unexpected conclusion may have influenced Baudelaire in his creation of Le Spleen de Paris.”

Aloysius Betrand’s “Gaspard de la nuit”: Baudelaire himself is quoted as citing this work as an inspiration for Paris Spleen

Gustave Flaubert: Magazine article “No ideas but in Crowds: Baudelaire’s Paris Spleen” cites similarities between the writers in that like Baudelaire, Flaubert held the same motives and intentions in that he too wanted “ to write the moral history of the men of my generation--or, more accurately, the history of their feelings."

Critical Reception:

The way in which the poem was received certainly lends to understanding the climate in which Baudelaire created Le Spleen de Paris, in that “It appears to be almost a diary entry, an explicit rundown of the day’s events; those events seem to be precisely the kind that Charles Baudelaire would have experienced in the hectic and hypocritical world of the literary marketplace of his day.”

Notable Critical Reception: In order to truly understand how Le Spleen de Paris was received, one must first be acquainted with Baudelaire’s earlier works. The repressions and upheavals of 1848 resulted in massive censorship of literature, which did not bode well for Baudelaire’s perhaps most famous work, Les Fleurs du Mal. Society was so shocked by the satanic references and sexual perversion in the book that at the time it was a critical and popular failure. This put the anticipated reception of Le Spleen de Paris at a disadvantage. Like “Flowers of Evil,” it wasn’t until much later that Paris Spleen was fully appreciated for what it was, a masterpiece that “brought the style of the prose poem to the broader republics of the people.” That being said, just four years after Arthur Rimbaud used Baudelaire’s work as a foundation for his poems, as he considered Baudelaire a great poet and pioneer of prose.

Appearance in Media: A 2006 film "Spleen," written by Eric Bomba-Ire, borrowed its title from Baudelaire's book of prose poems. Baudelaire expressed a particular feeling that he called Spleen which is a mixture of melancholy, rage, eros, and resignation, which ties in well with the movie's darkly woven tale of love, betrayal and passion.[12]
Notable quotations
This section contains information of unclear or questionable importance or relevance to the article's subject matter. Please help improve this article by clarifying or removing superfluous information. (April 2013)

In “Let us beat up the poor,” Baudelaire makes up a parable about economic and social equality: no one is entitled to it; it belongs to those who can win it and keep it. And he taunts the social reformer: “What do you think of that, Proudhon?” (Hill, 36.)

"At One in the Morning" is like a diary entry, a rundown of the day's events. In it, Baudelaire recognizes that he is part of a society full of hypocrites. His individual self becomes "blurred...by a hypocrisy and perverseness which progressively undermine the difference between the self and others." This is at least partly what Baudelaire meant by "a modern and more abstract life."[13]

"The Thyrsus" is a piece addressed to composer Franz Liszt. The ancient Greek thyrsus had connotations of "unleashed sexuality and violence, of the profound power of the irrational." Baudelaire believed the thyrsus to be an acceptable object of representation for Liszt's music.

In "The Bad Windowpane Maker" Baudelaire speaks of a "kind of energy that springs from ennui and reverie" that manifests itself in a particularly unexpected way in the most inactive dreamers. Doctors and moralists alike are at a loss to explain where such mad energy so suddenly comes from to these lazy people, why they suddenly feel the need to perform such absurd and dangerous deeds. (Hill, 56.)

The prefatory letter Baudelaire wrote to Arsene Houssaye, the editor of La Presse, was not necessarily intended to be included in the publication. When Baudelaire drew up his table of contents for the projected book form, he did not include the letter. It is possible, then, that the letter only appeared in La Presse as a means of flattery to ensure that Houssaye would publish the poems. (Mackenzie, xiii) Nevertheless, it allows us to understand Baudelaire's thinking about the genre of prose poetry:

Who among us has not dreamed, in his ambitious days, of the miracle of a poetic prose, musical without rhythm or rhyme, supple enough and jarring enough to be adapted to the soul's lyrical movements, the undulations of reverie, to the twists and turns that consciousness takes?

Table of contents (from Raymond N. Mackenzie's 2008 translation)

To Arsène Houssaye
1. The Foreigner
2. The Old Woman's Despair
3. The Artist's Confession
4. A Joker
5. The Double Room
6. To Each His Chimera
7. The Fool and Venus
8. The Dog and the Vial
9. The Bad Glazier
10. At One in the Morning
11. The Wild Woman and the Little Mistress
12. Crowds
13. The Widows
14. The Old Mountebank
15. Cake
16. The Clock
17. A Hemisphere in Her Hair
18. Invitation to the Voyage
19. The Toy of the Poor
20. The Fairies' Gifts
21. The Temptations: Or, Eros, Plutus, and Fame
22. Evening Twilight
23. Solitude
24. Plans
25. Beautiful Dorothy
26. The Eyes of the Poor
27. A Heroic Death
28. Counterfeit Money
29. The Generous Gambler
30. The Rope
31. Vocations
32. The Thyrsus
33. Get Yourself Drunk
34. Already!
35. Windows
36. The Desire to Paint
37. The Favors of the Moon
38. Which is the Real One?
39. A Thoroughbred
40. The Mirror
41. The Port
42. Portraits of Mistresses
43. The Gallant Marksman
44. The Soup and the Clouds
45. The Firing Range and the Graveyard
46. Loss of a Halo
47. Mademoiselle Bistouri
48. Any Where Out of the World
49. Let's Beat Up the Poor!
50. Good Dogs
References
This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (April 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

[13][14][15][16] [17][18][19][20][21][22][23]

Definition from Le Nouveau Petit Robert 2009
Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. Trans. Keith Waldrop. Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 2009. 9.
Richardson, Joanna. Baudelaire. St. Martin's Press: New York, 1994. 50.
Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. Trans. Keith Waldrop. Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 2009. 71.
Scott, Maria C. Baudelaire’s Le Spleen de Paris: Shifting Perspectives. Burlington: Ashgate Publishing Company, 2005. 196-197.
Hiddleston, J.A. Baudelaire and Le Spleen de Paris. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. 10-11.
Scott, Maria C. Baudelaire’s Le Spleen de Paris: Shifting Perspectives. Burlington: Ashgate Publishing Company, 2005. 54.
Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. Trans. Keith Waldrop. Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 2009. 62-64.
Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. Trans. Keith Waldrop. Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 2009. 73.
Berman, Marshall. “Baudelaire: Modernism in the Streets.” All that is solid melts into air. New York: Penguin Group Inc., 1988. 148. Google Books. 2009. 21 May 2009, books.google.com
Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. Trans. Keith Waldrop. Middleton: Wesleyan University Press, 2009. 3.
IMDb.com
Hill, Claire Ortiz. Roots and flowers of evil in Baudelaire, Nietzsche, and Hitler. Chicago: Open Court, 2006.
Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen and La Fanfarlo. Trans. Raymond N. Mackenzie. Indianapolis: Hackett Pub. Co., 2008.
Aggeler, William, Roy Campbell, Robert Lowell, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Lewis P. Shanks. "Fleurs du mal." Charle's Baudelaire's Flowers of Evil. 20 May 2009 fleursdumal.org
St. Vincent Millay, Edna. Fleurs du mal. 1936.
Bopsecrets.org
Bennett, Joseph D. Baudelaire: A Criticism. Princeton, N.J: Princeton UP, 1944.
Rabbitt, Kara M. "Reading and Otherness: The Interpretative Triangle in Baudelaire's Petits poèmes en prose." Nineteenth Century French Studies 33.3&4 (2005). Project MUSE.
Hamburger, Michael. "Introduction." Introduction. Twenty Prose Poems of Baudelaire. London: Poetry London, 1946. Vii-Xii.
Evans, Margery A. Baudelaire and Intertextuality: Poetry at the Crossroads. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993.
Emmanuel, Pierre. Baudelaire: The Paradox of Redemptive Satanism. Trans. Robert T. Cargo. University, AL: The University of Alabama P, 1967.

Ruff, M. A. "Prose Poems." Baudelaire. Trans. Agnes Kertesz. New York, NY: New York UP, 1966. 149-58.

External links

Charles Baudelaire—Largest site dedicated to Baudelaire's poems and prose, containing Fleurs du mal, Petit poemes et prose, Fanfarlo and more in French.

French Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Petits Poèmes en prose

Le Spleen de Paris: Full online downloadable text
Lo Spleen di Parigi: Italian translation online
No ideas but in Crowds: Baudelaire's Paris Spleen
Beaudelaire, Charles (1869). Paris Spleen. Louise Varèse. ISBN 978-0-8112-0007-3. (Translation: Louise Varèse, 1970)

Categories:

1869 booksFrench poetry collectionsWorks by Charles BaudelairePoems about citiesBooks published posthumously


This page was last modified on 6 July 2016, at 17:38.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:27

"Une seule hirondelle ne fait pas le printemps; un seul acte moral ne fait pas la vertu."
Aristote

Les 25 citations et proverbes : La morale c'est...

"La morale est dans la tête, et la moralité dans le cœur."
Citation de Pierre-Claude-Victor Boiste ; Dictionnaire universel (1843)

"La morale enseigne à modérer ses passions, à cultiver ses vertus et à réprimer ses vices."
Citation de Jean-Baptiste de La Roche ; Pensées et maximes (1843)

"La morale consiste à ne jamais faire le mal."
Citation de Hypolite de Livry ; Pensées et réflexions (1808)

"La morale n'est peut-être que la forme la plus cruelle de la méchanceté."
Citation de Henry Becque ; Pensées (1837-1899)

"La morale n'entend que le langage des faits."
Citation de Eugène Cloutier ; Les témoins (1954)

"La morale comme la pudeur est une des plus grandes sottises."
Citation de Francis Picabia ; Écrits critiques (2005)

"La morale qui discute est une pauvre morale."
Citation de Gustave Le Bon ; Psychologie de l'éducation (1902)

"La morale est une plante dont la racine est dans le ciel, et dont les fleurs et les fruits parfument et embellissent la terre."
Citation de Félicité Robert de Lamennais ; Pensées diverses (1854)

"La morale n'est faite que pour ceux qui n'en ont pas."
Citation de Madame de Girardin ; Lettres parisiennes, le 12 avril 1837.

"La morale est un talent de société."
Citation de Rémy de Gourmont ; Promenades philosophiques (1905)

"La morale s'apprend seulement par la pratique."
Citation de Gustave Le Bon ; Aphorismes du temps présent (1913)

"La morale est bien souvent le passeport de la médisance."
Citation de Napoléon Bonaparte ; Maximes et pensées (1769-1821)

"La morale a ses droits, le pouvoir a les siens."
Citation de Lucien Émile Arnault ; Le dernier jour de Tibère, III, 3 (1828)

"La morale, ça ne sort personne de la fosse commune."
Citation de Tahar Ben Jelloun ; La réclusion solitaire (1976)

"La morale est au sentiment ce que la logique est à l'intelligence."
Citation de Alexis Carrel ; Jour après jour (1956)

"La morale du sage est la voix de son cœur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 169 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La morale est la seule science de l'homme livré à la providence de l'homme."
Citation de Étienne Pivert de Senancour ; Oberman (1804)

"La morale sans culte fait des philosophes et des sages mondains."
Citation de Réflexion populaire ; Les Échos de la pensée, 18b (1855)

"La morale doit être l'étoile polaire de la science."
Citation de Chevalier de Boufflers ; Pensées et fragments (1816)

"La morale est une science frivole si l'on ne la confond avec la politique et la législation."
Citation de Claude-Adrien Helvétius ; De l'esprit (1758)

"La morale, ça ne sort personne de la fosse commune."
Citation de Tahar Ben Jelloun ; La réclusion solitaire (1976)

"La morale va au-devant de l'action ; la loi l'attend."
Citation de Chateaubriand ; Analyse raisonnée de l'histoire de france (1797)

"La morale austère anéantit la vigueur de l'esprit."
Citation de Vauvenargues ; Réflexions et maximes (1746)

"La morale est un avatar de l'instinct de conservation."
Citation de Louis Scutenaire ; Mes inscriptions, 1943-1944

"La morale n'est point un sentiment inné, c'est une lumière acquise."
Citation de Adolphe de Chesnel ; La sagesse populaire (1856)

"C'est par l'adresse que vaut le bûcheron, bien plus que par la force."
Homère


"La chance ne sourit qu'aux esprits bien préparés."
Louis Pasteur


"Je ne pense jamais au futur. Il vient bien assez tôt."
Albert Einstein


"Je vais bien, tout va bien, je suis gai, tout me plaît."
Dany Boon


"Ce n'est pas le bonheur qui nous manque, c'est la science du bonheur."
Maurice Maeterlinck


"La crainte suit le crime, et c'est son châtiment."
Voltaire


"Le bonheur est à ceux qui se suffisent à eux-mêmes."
Aristote


"Si les gens heureux n'ont pas d'histoire, ils feraient bien de ne pas nous la raconter."
Paul-Jean Toulet


"Les bons meurent souvent seuls, et ceux qui consolèrent ne sont pas toujours consolés."
Jules Michelet
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:27

Les 11 citations et proverbes moral :

"L'attrait donne la vie au monde moral, comme l'attraction donne le mouvement au monde physique."
Citation de Louis Joseph Mabire ; Dictionnaire de maximes (1830)

"Il est des femmes qui font de la fausseté une espèce de corset moral aussi nécessaire à leur vie que l'autre l'est au corps."
Citation de Honoré de Balzac ; Mémoires de deux jeunes mariées (1841)

"Au moral, comme au physique, la ligne droite est la plus courte."
Citation de Pierre-Claude-Victor Boiste ; Dictionnaire universel (1843)

"Un vieil aplomb moral à lui seul vaut tout le reste, il console de tout quand on n'a plus rien."
Citation de Gustave Flaubert ; Lettre à Ernest Chevalier, le 23 février 1847.

"Le jugement est la pierre d'assise de tout l'être moral."
Citation de Edmond Thiaudière ; La proie du néant (1886)

"Avoir le moral est loin d'une rapide guérison, et vous seul pouvez l'opérer."
Citation de George Sand ; Valentine (1831)

"Quand on a le moral en compote, c'est le corps qu'il faut soigner."
Citation de Fréderic Dard ; Les pensées de San-Antonio (1996)

"Au physique comme au moral, l'action ne vient qu'après la puissance."
Citation de Mirabeau ; Discours à la Tribune nationale, le 30 janvier 1789.

"Quiconque rit du mal, quel que soit ce mal, n'a pas le sens moral parfaitement droit."
Citation de Joseph Joubert ; De la politesse, LXXX (1866)

"Il y a un tact moral qui s'étend à tout et que le méchant n'a point."
Citation de Denis Diderot ; Discours sur la poésie dramatique (1758)

"L'arbitraire est au moral ce que la peste est au physique."
Citation de Benjamin Constant ; L'esprit de conquête et de l'usurpation (1814)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:28

Les 25 citations et proverbes : La raison.

"La raison est lente à profiter des lumières de l'expérience, et à secouer le joug de l'habitude."
Citation de Gabriel Bonnot de Mably ; Entretiens de Phocion (1763)

"La raison et la volonté sont les deux déesses de la vie pratique."
Citation de Henri-Frédéric Amiel ; Journal intime, le 4 août 1872.

"La raison n'est pas toujours de saison, il faut quelquefois la perdre avec les fous."
Citation de Ménandre ; Fragments - IVe s. av. J.-C.

"La raison a besoin de l'expérience, mais l'expérience est inutile sans la raison."
Citation de Stanislas Leszczynski ; Le philosophe bienfaisant (1764)

"La raison et la volonté font notre indépendance et la mesurent en même temps."
Citation de Henri-Frédéric Amiel ; Fragments d'un journal intime (1821-1881)

"La raison est la faculté qui juge toutes les autres."
Citation de Madame de Staël ; La littérature (1799)

"La raison ne vient aux femmes que quand il leur est bien prouvé qu'il leur est impossible d'être folles, c'est presque toujours faute de mieux que les plus sensées l'écoutent."
Citation de Pierre-Jules Stahl ; L'esprit des femmes et les femmes d'esprit (1855)

"La raison d'un étourdi est comme une bougie où la mèche manque par intervalle."
Citation de Jean-Napoléon Vernier ; Fables, pensées et poésies (1865)

"La raison est toujours insuffisante pour instruire ceux dont le sentiment est faible."
Citation de Simon de Bignicourt ; Pensées et réflexions philosophiques (1755)

"La raison souvent n'éclaire que les naufrages."
Citation de Claude-Adrien Helvétius ; Proverbes, maximes et pensées (1765)

"La raison est une montre dont l'aiguille marche sans qu'on s'en aperçoive ; si quelquefois elle s'arrête, il y a toujours au-dedans de la montre un ressort qu'il suffit de mettre en action pour donner du mouvement à l'aiguille."
Citation de Jean-Jacques de Lingrée ; Réflexions et maximes (1814)

"La raison ne triomphe pas des passions, elle leur succède."
Citation de Adrien Destailleur ; Observations morales, critiques et politiques (1830)

"La raison peut nous avertir de ce qu'il faut éviter ; le cœur seul dit ce qu'il faut faire."
Citation de Joseph Joubert ; De la sagesse, L (1866)

"La raison du plus fou est toujours la meilleure."
Citation de Raymond Devos ; Sens dessus dessous (1976)

"La raison est la borne de l'encerclement de l'énergie."
Citation de William Blake ; Le mariage du ciel et de l'enfer (1794)

"La raison parle et le sentiment mord."
Citation de Pétrarque ; Sonnet - XIVe siècle.

"La raison doit l'emporter sur la force."
Citation de Jonathan Swift ; Les voyages de Gulliver (1726)

"La raison seule fait distinguer les personnes d'une vertu ou d'un mérite supérieur."
Citation de Jonathan Swift ; Les voyages de Gulliver (1726)

"La raison n'a pas de prise sur les esprits faux, c'est peine perdue que de chercher à les convaincre."
Citation de Pierre-Marc-Gaston de Levis ; Maximes et préceptes (1808)

"La raison doit être le flambeau qui éclaire."
Citation de Cardinal de Richelieu ; Maximes d'État (1623)

"La raison et la prudence abrègent les excès de l'impertinence."
Citation de Destouches ; Le glorieux, IV, 4, le 18 janvier 1732.

"La raison naît en nous de l'expérience aidée de la réflexion ; et quand elle est devenue tout ce qu'elle doit être, on s'informe aussi peu de nos folies passées que de la fleur qui a précédé un excellent fruit."
Citation de Jean-Jacques de Lingrée ; Réflexions et maximes (1814)

"La raison, pour nous, c'est la mort : à calculer, tout calculer... nous périrons avant l'heure."
Citation de Madame de Girardin ; Lettres parisiennes, le 29 mars 1845.

"La raison n'est raison qu'autant qu'elle nous touche."
Citation de Fabre d'Églantine ; Les précepteurs (1799)

"La raison ne peut avoir d'étendue que par le sentiment de ses limites."
Citation de Simon de Bignicourt ; Pensées et réflexions philosophiques (1755)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:29

Les 40 citations et proverbes : La sagesse.

"La sagesse n'est pas le lot d'un seul être : tout ce qui vit en a une part."
Citation de Épicharme ; Fragments - VIe s. av. J.-C.

"La sagesse est la fille de l'usage et de la mémoire."
Citation de Isocrate ; Discours de morale - IVe s. av. J.-C.

"La sagesse des femmes ne fait pas tant de bien dans le monde que les apparences y cachent de désordres."
Citation de Adolphe d'Houdetot ; Dix épines pour une fleur (1853)

"La sagesse défend de juger sur de simples apparences, d'ajouter foi à tout ce qu'on entend, de faire tout ce qu'on peut, de dire tout ce qu'on fait, et de dépenser tout ce qu'on a. On trouve pourtant quelquefois de rigides observateurs des premières de ces maximes, qui, par malheur, ont négligé d'observer la dernière."
Citation de Axel Oxenstiern ; Réflexions sur la sagesse (1652)

"La sagesse consiste à juger le bon sens et la folie, et à se prêter à l'illusion universelle sans en être dupe."
Citation de Henri-Frédéric Amiel ; Fragments d'un journal intime (1821-1881)

"La sagesse est égoïste, elle aime à jouir ; la vertu est généreuse, elle aime à faire jouir. Ô vous qui souffrez, recherchez les vertueux et fuyez les sages, ces invalides chauves de la vertu !"
Citation de Auguste Guyard ; Quintessences (1847)

"La sagesse et la vérité, en nous éclairant, rendent notre amour-propre plus habile, et nous apprennent que nos véritables intérêts sont de nous attacher à la vertu, et que la vertu amène les doux plaisirs de l'amitié."
Citation de Marquise de Lambert ; Traité de l'amitié (1732)

"La sagesse agit comme la glace qui refroidit mais qui conserve."
Citation de Jean-Napoléon Vernier ; Fables, pensées et poésies (1865)

"La sagesse serait sans mérite chez un homme né sans passions : où il n'y a pas de combat, il n'y a pas de victoire ; où il n'y a pas de victoire, il n'y a pas de triomphe ; et où il n'y a pas de triomphe, il n'y a pas de mérite."
Citation de Hypolite de Livry ; Pensées et réflexions (1808)

"La sagesse est cette rare concordance, cette heureuse harmonie des facultés et des désirs que la nature, en ses jours de largesse, accorde aux hommes d'élite, et qui produit en eux une liberté d'âme parfaite."
Citation de Marie d'Agoult ; Esquisses morales (1849)

"La sagesse vaut mieux que la force, et l'homme prudent que l'homme vaillant."
Citation de Antoine Arnauld ; La logique ou L'art de penser (1683)

"La sagesse perce par les rayons de sa vérité les ténèbres les plus profonds de l'âme, et les dissipe."
Citation de Jean-Baptiste de La Roche ; Pensées et maximes (1843)

"La sagesse s'obtient en observant et comprenant les incidents quotidiens dans les relations humaines."
Citation de Jiddu Krishnamurti ; De l'éducation (1953)

"La sagesse dans les conseils est le don naturel de raisonner juste."
Citation de Platon ; Les définitions - IVe s. av. J.-C.

"La sagesse fait le bonheur de tous."
Citation de René Barjavel ; Ravage (1943)

"La sagesse n'est jamais du côté de celui qui parle."
Citation de Amélie Nothomb ; Les Catilinaires (1995)

"La sagesse n'est bien souvent que l'impuissance de l'imagination."
Citation de Goswin de Stassart ; Pensées et maximes (1780-1854)

"La sagesse humaine éloigne les maux de la vie ; la sagesse divine fait seule trouver les vrais biens."
Citation de Joseph Joubert ; De la sagesse, VII (1866)

"La sagesse est le repos dans la lumière ; heureux sont les esprits assez élevés pour se jouer dans ses rayons !"
Citation de Joseph Joubert ; De la sagesse, II (1866)

"La sagesse ménage une heureuse tranquillité."
Citation de Pline le Jeune ; Lettre à Valens - IIe siècle.

"La sagesse consiste plus à doubler la somme de ses plaisirs qu'à multiplier celle de ses peines."
Citation de Marquis de Sade ; Justine ou les malheurs de la vertu (1787)

"La sagesse humaine apprend beaucoup, si elle apprend à se taire."
Citation de Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet ; Élévations à Dieu, XX, 16 (posthume, 1727)

"La sagesse est la santé de l'esprit et du cœur."
Citation de Alphonse Karr ; Nouvelles guêpes (1853)

"La sagesse n'est point dans le nombre des années mais dans la tête."
Citation de la Turquie ; Proverbes et dictons turcs (1882)

"La sagesse distingue le bien, la vertu le pratique."
Citation de Jean-Benjamin de Laborde ; Pensées et maximes (1791)


"La sagesse paraît sur le visage du sage, mais les regards du fou parcourent la terre."
Citation de George Sand ; Lettres d'un voyageur (1834)

"La sagesse marche entre la défiance et la témérité ; le sentier est difficile."
Citation de Étienne Pivert de Senancour ; Oberman (1804)

"La sagesse hésite quand la sottise décide."
Citation de La Rochefoucauld-Doudeauville ; Livre des pensées, 291 (1861)

"La sagesse est la richesse de l'homme qui ne peut plus être fou."
Citation de Alphonse Karr ; Sous les tilleuls (1832)

"La sagesse consiste à connaître Dieu, et à se connaître soi-même."
Citation de Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet ; Traité de la connaissance de Dieu (1741)

"La sagesse est d'être fou lorsque les circonstances en valent la peine."
Citation de Jean Cocteau ; Opium (1930)

"La sagesse se trouve sur les lèvres d'un homme sage."
Citation de Salomon ; La Bible, X, 13 - Xe s. av. J.-C.

"La sagesse est la santé de l'âme."
Citation de Cicéron ; Tusculanae Disputationes - env. 45 av. J.-C.

"La sagesse n'est pas toujours inaltérable."
Citation de La Chaussée ; La gouvernante (1747)

"La sagesse n'est que dans la vérité."
Citation de Goethe ; Maximes et réflexions (1749-1832)

"La sagesse n'a rien d'austère ni d'affecté, c'est elle qui donne les vrais plaisirs. Elle seule sait les rendre purs et durables ; elle prépare le plaisir par le travail, et elle délasse du travail par le plaisir."
Citation de Fénelon ; Les aventures de Télémaque (1699)

"La sagesse est préférable à tous les autres biens."
Citation de La Bible ; Livre de la sagesse, VII, I - Ier s. av. J.-C.

"La sagesse est plus vulnérable que la beauté, car la sagesse est un art impur."
Citation de André Malraux ; L'espoir (1937)

"La sagesse, c'est de ne pas avoir les défauts des fous."
Citation de Alexandre Dumas, fils ; Aventures de quatre femmes (1847)

"La sagesse est un bien qu'aucune puissance ne peut nous enlever sans notre consentement."
Citation de Adolphe de Chesnel ; La sagesse populaire (1856)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:29

Les 21 citations et proverbes : Sagesse et Amour.

"L'amour des femmes tue la sagesse."
Citation de l'Orient ; Maximes et sentences orientales (1784)

"Amour et sagesse sont des présents dont le ciel est avare."
Citation de Citation latine ; Proverbes et sentences latines - Ier s. av. J.-C.

"Où il n'y a pas d'amour, il n'y a pas de sagesse."
Citation de Fiodor Dostoïevski ; Les carnets du sous-sol (1864)

"Le véritable amour nourrit une dialogique toujours vivante où sagesse et folie s'entre-génèrent."
Citation de Edgar Morin ; La méthode, Éthique (2004)

"L'amour est l'hôte de la sagesse."
Citation de Henri de Régnier ; Le trèfle noir (1895)

"La vie est plus belle que ne la consentent les hommes : la sagesse n'est pas dans la raison, mais dans l'amour."
Citation de André Gide ; Les nouvelles nourritures (1935)

"La sagesse et l'amour ne s'accordent jamais."
Citation de Chevalier de Méré ; Maximes et sentences (1687)

"L'amour est la sagesse du fou et la déraison du sage."
Citation de Samuel Johnson ; L'histoire de Rasselas (1759)

"Le premier pas dans la sagesse, c'est l'amour d'un Dieu révélé ; c'est le mépris de la richesse : on peut l'avoir, puisque je l'ai."
Citation de Gustave Nadaud ; Ma philosophie (1851)

"L'amour et la sagesse s'unissent pour donner naissance à la vérité."
Citation de Aïvanhov ; Qu'est-ce qu'un maître spirituel (1982)

"Pour être heureux par l'amour, il faut une certaine sagesse ; il faut aussi une certaine sagesse pour se passer d'amour."
Citation de Jacques Chardonne ; L'amour du prochain (1932)

"L'amour alimente la sagesse, et la sagesse alimente l'amour."
Citation de Maurice Maeterlinck ; La sagesse et la destinée (1898)

"Finissons ce débat inutile, rassemblons en ces deux époux ; ce que la Sagesse a d'utile, et ce que l'Amour a de doux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Sans les dons de la Sagesse, ceux d'Amour sont bien dangereux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La philosophie n'est rien d'autre que l'amour de la sagesse."
Citation de Cicéron ; De officiis - env. 43 av. J.-C.

"Il n'y a pas de sagesse au-dessous de la ceinture."
Citation de Edward Matthew Hale ; Pensées (1924)

"L'amour rend, comme un autre, un sage inconséquent."
Citation de La Chaussée ; La gouvernante (1747)

"L'amour sage est plus méritant que touchant."
Citation de Anne Barratin ; Pensées in Œuvres posthumes (1920)

"La sagesse n'est pas dans la raison, mais dans l'amour."
Citation de André Gide ; Les nouvelles nourritures (1935)

"Le premier soupir de l'amour est le dernier de la sagesse."
Citation de Antoine Bret ; L'école amoureuse, VII, le 11 septembre 1747.

"Et quand l'amour vous échappe ? Reste l'amitié, comme disent les sages."
Citation de Alexandre Dumas, fils ; Aventures de quatre femmes (1847)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:36

Les 117 citations extraites de la sagesse populaire.

"Prescrire l'affection, c'est commander l'hypocrisie : l'attachement doit naître de lui-même."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La sincérité est le tribut de l'amitié, elle est sa caution et détermine son existence."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'ingratitude peut quelquefois s'excuser, mais jamais se justifier."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Des livres ne prends, pour ton bien, que ce qu'il faut, mais fais-le bien."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Sois modéré même dans la bonté, afin de rendre tes regrets moins fréquents."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Ne redoute point l'homme qui s'agite inutilement, mais redoute celui qui demeure toujours calme."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Que ton mécontentement n'ait jamais le caractère de l'injure."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Quel que soit ton mécontentement, aie toujours un langage poli qui te maintienne dans ton droit."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le succès donne du talent ; la réussite du courage."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Dans le doute, mieux vaut savoir faire marche arrière."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'amour de Dieu est doux et tranquille, l'amour du monde est amer et inquiet."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le plus doux repos est toujours celui qui s'achète par la fatigue."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Un sot ne se fatigue jamais de porter en lui sa sottise."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'homme qui saisit à peine le présent, qui oublie le passé, ne peut prévoir l'avenir."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Insulter au malheur des autres, c'est mettre le comble à l'inhumanité."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'éducation fait la différence entre les hommes : les talents la font prodigieuse, et la fortune encore plus."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le temps est tout : cinq minutes font la différence entre la défaite et la victoire."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Point de vertu sans croire en Dieu, point de bonheur sans vertu."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Tout excès de fierté prend sa source dans la médiocrité."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La fierté du cœur est l'attribut des honnêtes gens ; la fierté des manières est celle des sots."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La réussite ou l'échec sont la rançon du savoir-faire."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Réussite engendre succès ; succès engendre suite."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le succès est dû à la prévoyance ; la réussite reflète la compétence."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le succès naît de la persévérance."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Deux sortes d'hommes ne réfléchissent point : l'homme effrayé et le téméraire."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui a plusieurs métiers, n'en a aucun."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui est propre à tout n'est propre à rien."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Une belle femme est un miroir où chacun peut se mirer."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le secret est la garde la plus assurée de l'amour."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le libéral double le mérite du présent par le sentiment, l'avare le gâte par le regret."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les gens de cœur et d'esprit se font leur fortune eux-mêmes."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les plus beaux efforts de l'esprit humain sont ceux qui tendent à perfectionner notre raison."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Vous cesserez de craindre, dès que vous cesserez de désirer."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le bien a toujours de puissants ennemis, et le mal trouve presque toujours de la protection."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Afin d'aider vos amis, ayez toujours trois choses ouvertes : la main, le visage et le cœur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La satiété des plaisirs est le tourment des heureux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Une des premières vertus est de tolérer chez les autres ce qu'on s'interdit à soi-même."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Souffrez que l'amour vous lie, jeunes cœurs, cédez à ses feux : Sans l'Amour et la Folie, il n'est point de moments heureux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La communication est la base de toute relation."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La communication est la base de tout enrichissement."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

Les citations de la sagesse populaire :

"C'est marcher à grands pas que de s'arrêter à propos."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Imposer, sans proposer une concertation, cela est voué à l'échec."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'hypocrite a toujours deux visages, et souvent deux cœurs."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'affection découvre plutôt ce qu'on est qu'elle ne fait voir ce qu'on voudrait paraître."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"On n'est jamais plus fin que lorsqu'on n'a pas besoin de l'être."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il y a un mépris des éloges qui n'est pas modestie, mais orgueil."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il faut bien du courage et de la modération pour soutenir l'ingratitude de ceux qu'on aime."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"On est toujours petit quand on a des faiblesses à cacher, des intérêts à soutenir."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le vrai mérite désire d'être honoré, comme il s'honore lui-même."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les louanges sont des satires quand elles ne sont pas sincères."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Une haine à soutenir est un plus grand fardeau qu'on ne pense."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les animosités les mieux fondées sont toujours un grand fardeau à soutenir."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La plus grande difficulté dans l'éducation des enfants, est que les parents soient un exemple."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'homme de courage est inébranlable ; s'il est renversé, il combat à genoux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il y a peu de difficultés insurmontables pour celui qui les combat avec un courage opiniâtre."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'opportunité est une occasion qui ne se présentera qu'une fois à toi ; saisis-la."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'opportunité, c'est le don de l'à-propos, c'est l'art de saisir l'occasion : occasio prœceps."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Finissons ce débat inutile, rassemblons en ces deux époux ; ce que la Sagesse a d'utile, et ce que l'Amour a de doux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Sans les dons de la Sagesse, ceux d'Amour sont bien dangereux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'imprudence laisse échapper les secrets, l'amitié les confie ; l'amour, le véritable amour les livre, et ne s'en aperçoit pas."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Plus l'amour vieillit, plus il est faible ; l'amitié devient plus forte en vieillissant."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'estime est plus flatteuse que l'amitié et que l'amour, elle captive mieux les cœurs et fait moins d'ingrats."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La vie parait trop courte à ceux qui savent en jouir et en connaissent le prix."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui de femme honnête est séparé, d'un don divin est privé."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La paresse est, de tous les vices, la plus niaise ; elle ne mène qu'à l'ignorance."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La modération est la langueur et la paresse de l'âme ; l'ambition en est l'activité et l'ardeur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'esprit s'attache, par paresse et par constance, a ce qui lui est facile ou agréable."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La promptitude à croire le mal sans l'examiné, est un effet de l'orgueil et de la paresse."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La sincère amitié est si rare qu'elle est inappréciable, mais rien n'est plus commun que la simulation de ce sentiment."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il est plus honorable de confesser ses fautes que de vanter ses mérites."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"L'ingratitude est une banqueroute morale."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La solitude laisse à la réflexion le temps d'examiner tous les mouvements de l'âme."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il en coûte peu pour plaire, mais il en coûte beaucoup pour plaire longtemps."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Un secret ne pèse jamais tant que lorsqu'on est le plus prêt à s'en décharger."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le bonheur n'est agréable qu'autant qu'on a la connaissance du malheur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Connaître et sentir son bonheur, c'est en doubler la jouissance."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les bienfaits sont le seul trésor qui s'accroît à mesure qu'on le partage."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il est rare que l'amour ne soit fou dans une âme folle."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les plaisirs imprévus sont les plus agréables."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui ne tient pas sa promesse, n'est guère plus lié que s'il n'avait rien promis."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

Les citations de la sagesse populaire :

"Toute promesse d'intérêt s'évanouit, dès que l'intérêt cesse."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Pour son bonheur entretenir, promettre ne faut sans tenir."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La femme est à l'homme ce que le soleil est à la lune."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Votre femme est une rose, disait-on à un poète aveugle : Je m'en doutais aux épines, répondit-il !"
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui se marie se met en chemin pour faire pénitence."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Si vous voulez rendre le mariage impossible, accordez à la femme les mêmes droits qu'à l'homme."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le plus grand tort de tous les hommes envers leurs femmes, c'est de les avoir épousées."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La femme libre, c'est un navire à la merci des flots."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Un célibataire, c'est un vieillard en enfance."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il faut une grande fermeté pour dissimuler un grand outrage."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Les conseils peuvent passer pour sincères quand on s'offre de les exécuter."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"En amour, qui donne tout sans réserve, n'a plus besoin de compter."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le temps n'est jamais perdu s'il est donné aux autres."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui a faute d'argent et d'or, bien repose et sûrement dort."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Aux pauvres un œuf, vaut tout autant qu'un bœuf."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Le monde parle, l'onde roule, le vent souffle et l'âge s'écoule."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Bonne épargne dans la jeunesse, se retrouve dans la vieillesse."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"La vie est une lampe ; jouis-en tandis qu'elle brûle : si tu dors, c'est autant de perdu."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Il n'y a point de temps perdu, les uns ont le bon, les autres le mauvais."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Passant, le temps se passera, et le temps passé jamais ne reviendra."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Si tu fatigues ton terrain, en culture tu n'es pas fin."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui n'arrose pas le pouvant, en culture n'est pas savant."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"En culture tous les progrès, pour le pays sont des bienfaits."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"En culture être le premier, ne se peut faire sans étudier."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Veux-tu rendre ton bien meilleur ? Toi-même sois-en régisseur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Si vous voulez que votre mérite soit connu, reconnaissez le mérite des autres."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Homme qui paye ce qu'il doit, est plus riche que l'on ne croit."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Mieux vaut payer et peu avoir, qu'avoir moult (beaucoup) et toujours devoir."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Quand parler d'autrui tu voudras, regarde toi, tu te tairas."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Pour faire l'achat d'un domaine, réfléchis plus d'une semaine."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Sans hypothèque, de ton bien, crois-moi, n'afferme jamais rien."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Qui connaît le sol et le ciel, en culture sait l'essentiel."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Sache-le bien : expérience, en culture, passe science."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Que vos amis absents aient autant de place dans votre mémoire que les présents."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Si ton ami a commis quelque offense, ne va soudain contre lui t'irriter, et doucement, pour ne le dépiter, fais lui ta plainte et reçois sa défense."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Un cœur qui sait régler ses désirs, sait triompher de toutes choses."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)

"Dormant la grasse matinée, n'espère pas de bonne année."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Recueil d'apophtegmes et axiomes (1855)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:37

Les citations amérindiennes
Les 16 citations et pensées amérindiennes.

"Agis maintenant ; si tu vois ce qu'il faut faire, fais-le."
Citation amérindienne ; Sagesse amérindienne, Dhyani Ywahoo (2003)

"Ne fais pas de comparaison, considère chaque chose pour ce qu'elle est. Respecte toute vie, dégage ton coeur de l'ignorance, ne tue pas et ne nourris pas de pensées coléreuses."
Citation amérindienne ; Sagesse amérindienne, Dhyani Ywahoo (2003)

"Ne dis que la vérité, ne parle que des bonnes qualités des autres, sois un confident et ne répands aucune rumeur, écarte le voile de la colère pour libérer la beauté inhérente à chacun."
Citation amérindienne ; Sagesse amérindienne, Dhyani Ywahoo (2003)

"L'étreinte sexuelle est créatrice d'étoiles. Elle revit l'aube du monde, sa création, voit naître le premier soleil. L'homme et la femme se placent dans sa lumière, sous sa protection."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"L'amour entre l'homme et la femme est une danse de joie, une haute célébration de vie. L'homme et la femme font l'expérience de l'amour universel dans un même corps."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Les différentes manières d'aimer sont les joyaux de la nature et de sa splendeur. Considère toutes les formes d'amour comme les couleurs d'un même arc-en-ciel."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"L'amour et l'amitié sont des tentatives pour élargir le cercle, et retrouver l'unité perdue."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"La terre n'appartient pas à l'homme, c'est l'homme qui appartient à la terre."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Mariage - Soyez liés l'un à l'autre comme les arbres sont liés à la terre ; ainsi votre amour portera le fruit de belles et de nombreuses saisons."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Puisse le Grand Esprit vous envoyer ses présents les mieux choisis. Puisse le Père soleil et la Mère lune vous éclairer de leurs plus doux rayons."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Il n'y a devant vous qu'une seule et unique vie. Que vos jours soient bons, et longs sur la terre."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Faites vivre votre passion, elle vous réchauffera quand le monde deviendra froid."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"L'ami arrive comme le vent du printemps, avec des parfums de fleur, il se tient sur le seuil de l'âme, toujours joyeux et bienveillant."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Élève-toi si tu veux vivre un amour plus grand, plus vaste."
Citation amérindienne ; La sagesse amérindienne (1837)

"Lorsque les hommes crachent sur la terre, ils crachent sur eux-mêmes."
Citation amérindienne ; Chef Seattle (1854)

"Apprenez à vos enfants ce que nous apprenons à nos enfants, que la terre est notre mère."
Citation amérindienne ; Chef Seattle (1854)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Sam 10 Sep à 3:38

Les citations populaires d'auteurs anonymes
Les 46 citations d'auteurs anonymes.

"Le découragement est beaucoup plus douloureux que la patience."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 11 - XVIIIe siècle.

"L'homme juge du cœur par les paroles, et Dieu des paroles par le cœur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 1 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Soyez ridicule une fois, on croira que vous l'êtes toujours."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 110 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Rien ne gêne tant que la présence de ceux dont on redoute l'indiscrétion."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 39 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Après la mort, il ne reste aucun regret à la vie."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 36 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La vie se passe à courir des plaisirs à l'ennui, et à retourner de l'ennui aux plaisirs."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 35 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La vie s'use souvent plus dans les plaisirs que dans les peines."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 34 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Comment aimer une vie qui mène à la mort par des chemins toujours semés d'épines ?"
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 33 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La plus triste des morts est celle de la jeunesse qu'on est longtemps à regretter."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 32 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La politesse ne devrait être autre chose que la bonté du cœur mise en action."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 31 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Le repentir naît où les passions meurent."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 30 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La plus haute vengeance à exercer contre celui qui médit est le mépris ou l'oubli."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 29 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La délicatesse est la perfection de la sensibilité et la recherche du sentiment."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 28 - XVIIIe siècle.

"L'humilité est la chasteté de l'esprit, et la pudeur de l'amour de soi-même."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 27 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La vieillesse est honorable pour tout cœur bien né."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 26 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Un père et une mère sont naturellement nos premiers amis ; personne d'autre au monde à qui nous soyons plus redevables."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 24 - XVIIIe siècle.

"L'amour véritable est éternel, rien ne peut le briser ; l'amour est fort comme la mort."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 112 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Le sommeil des sens répare le réveil de la raison."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 164 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La fainéantise est une mort prématurée : ce n'est pas vivre que de ne pas agir."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 163 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Quand le cœur s'attendrit, l'esprit en est plus beau."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 160 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Dites ce que vous pensez, et ne faites pas trop valoir votre opinion."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 130 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Quand le cœur s'ouvre aux passions, il s'ouvre à l'ennemi de la vie."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 114 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Il faut être bien sûr de soi-même pour juger les autres."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 101 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La gloire et la vérité ont leurs délices : elles sont la volupté de l'âme et du cœur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 19 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Les malheureux n'ont souvent plus rien à craindre, et tout à espérer."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 2 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La peur est plus persuasive que la raison."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 120 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Il y a bien de l'esprit à savoir se taire à propos."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 87 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Être riche n'est rien, le tout est d'être heureux."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 83 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Respectez, en toute occasion, les usages, le rang et la bienséance."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 81 - XVIIIe siècle.

"N'exigez jamais de reconnaissance, et l'on vous en rendra davantage."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 75 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Les méchants sont hardis, les sages sont timides."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 72 - XVIIIe siècle.

"On affaiblit tout ce qu'on exagère."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 118 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Songe à ceux qui n'ont rien, et tu te contenteras de peu."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 111 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Il est plus facile de changer ses désirs que l'ordre du monde."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 107 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Donnez votre approbation avec jugement, si vous voulez qu'on vous en sache gré."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 135 - XVIIIe siècle.

"On ne plaît guère lorsque pour plaire il faut sortir du naturel."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 139 - XVIIIe siècle.

"N'entrez jamais dans la passion de vos amis."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 150 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Faites votre plaisir de vos devoirs, et le monde vous en récompensera."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 181 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La morale du sage est la voix de son cœur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 169 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Attachez-vous à la vertu, vous n'aurez pas à vous plaindre de la fortune."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 157 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Pour parler à propos, il faut parler rarement."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 144 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Des heureux que l'on fait on reçoit le bonheur."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 122 - XVIIIe siècle.

"La simplicité est la coquetterie du bon goût."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 105 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Les enfants et les fous s'imaginent que vingt francs et vingt ans n'ont jamais de fin."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 49 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Pardonne à tous, et rien à toi."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 25 - XVIIIe siècle.

"Les hommes font les lois, les femmes font les mœurs."
Citation de la sagesse populaire ; Sentences et maximes morales, 22 - XVIIIe siècle.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Mar 13 Sep à 10:00

Toulouse, le 13 Septembre 2016

"Lettre vers tous les Croyants, les Laics, les Athées et Indiférents sans distinction de sexes et d'appartenance"

"A travers l'histoire, il y a tout ces regards qui porte sur l'espérance d'une terre bénite où résonne la paix et l'harmonie si désireuse dans le cœur de l'Homme. Certains ont construit et d'autres ont détruit... Les Femmes n'eurent pas dans un premier temps à se soucier de leur image, telle des lionnes, elles étaient libre de se soumettre ou de se dérober à l'acte naturel de la Nature et de ses lois. Mais voilà; nous avons voulu une femme unique dans sa présentation et son comportement: La diversité lui fut enlevé et l'Homme perdit son statut d'être suprême de Dieu. Les Hyènes, les lions et les Éléphants devint les inspirateurs de l'évolution humaine, plus nous apprenons à observer ce qui reste de sauvage dans la nature, nous voyions que nous avons voulu supprimer ces codes d'honneurs... Ce qui était preuve de charité fut transformé en faiblesse ! Le lion qui élevait les fils de ses frères, ce lion là fut tué par les Hommes et ceux qui prirent sa défense furent exilés du cœur des femmes... On les transforma pour les soustraire à leurs regards... Trouvé vous cela juste mesdames d'être puni pour un acte de bonté à l'égard de ce lion qui adopta les orphelins de ces crimes et qui honoré les dettes des Dames Lionnes à l'égard de Yahvé, Dieu, Allah, Vishnou ou Éternel est l’Éternel. Oui malgré mon sens laïque, je crois au courage de la Charité et de la Valeur malgré tout j'ai perdu ma naïveté devant le Lâche, le Traitre, l’Envieux et la Haine. J'aime le regard tel le lion qui protège son territoire, Sa Lionne et Son Peuple et qui n'ose pas cacher son admiration devant les singes et les éléphants imprégné de sagesse et de Bonté... Le Courage de la Girafe, la Hargne de la Hyène, l'endurance du Serpent, la moquerie du Scorpion et les enseignements de la Mouche. Les Mouches indiquent l'eau et sont des reversoirs aussi utile que le Chameau et le Cheval... Les hirondelles qui faisait sourire les Femmes et les Enfants; Et malgré la Cruauté du Temps, il y avait toujours une place pour la valeur du Courage et du charitable... Voilà à partir de quoi et selon les percepts de Gordon Pacha et l’Enseignement de l’Écoute du Temps et de La Nature nous pouvons reconstruire Alep, Petra et tous ces Oasis qui faisait les charmes de nos querelles de Commerçants, de Patriarches et de Familles. Nous ne pourrons jamais éviter des querelles ou des discordes de Voisinages, mais Sauvegarder Notre Honneur, ça sera mon premier engagement d'Homme contre l'Esclavage, le Viol, la Torture, La Faim, La soif et pour l'équilibre, le partage, la manifestation, l'égalité, de réunion et de gréve."

Ecrit de
TAY
La chouette effraie.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.   Aujourd'hui à 19:06

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le Spleen de Paris and the flowers of evil or Nina.
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Quéffélec en anti-Normand dans Paris Match.
» Le Grand Paris
» La Normandie à Paris. 13 et 14 Juin.
» Abolition du foie gras 11/11/2010 Paris : compte-rendu
» boutique MUFE pro sur Paris

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
La.cinquieme.République :: La.cinquieme.République-
Sauter vers: