La.cinquieme.République

De la politique pure et affaires étrangeres
 
AccueilAccueil  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca   Lun 5 Sep à 9:05


Putting critical realism to work for education and revolution
Issue: 151
Posted on 22nd June 2016
Gail Edwards

A review of Grant Banfield, Critical Realism for Marxist Sociology of Education (Routledge, 2016), £95

Marxists are interested in the role education and schooling play in history and revolution. But classical Marxist studies in the sociology of education have remained marginalised by mainstream, gloomy neo- and post-Marxist assessments of education’s emancipatory potential. In this meticulously researched piece of scholarship, however, Grant Banfield brings Roy Bhaskar’s critical realist philosophy to work as a redemptive conceptual intervention in the field. The result is a powerful rejoinder to those who have dismissed classical Marxism in the study of the relationship between education and the social order.

It’s important to the book’s argument that we understand these post-Marxist and neo-Marxist sociologies of education as descendants of Western Marxism. Western Marxism emerged during the West’s inter-war period. Antonio Gramsci, and later, George Lukács and Louis Althusser, laid the groundwork for the sociology of education’s neo-Marxist turn in the 1970s, a classic of which in the UK is Paul Willis’s 1977 Learning to Labour. Both neo-Marxism and post-Marxism entailed a decisive shift away from economic matters towards the cultural-philosophical Marx, prompting a reconceptualisation of class as social identity and rendering “classism” on a par with racism, ableism and sexism in maintaining educational discrimination.

The book’s author notes the way neo- and post-Marxists justified this cultural turn. This was by reference to Marx’s perceived methodological shortcomings such as his abstract object of study. Marx’s object is not (as for monetarist or Keynesian economists) market exchange relations, but rather productive relations and forces operating behind reality’s appearance. Given their unavailability to direct observation, it’s easy for critics of Marx to question their existence—or at least the possibility of studying them. We can observe individuals, so their argument goes, but not abstractions like “the proletariat” or “capitalism”.

The cultural turn also aroused suspicion of Marxists’ claim to be scientific. It is widely seen as positivist folly to transfer natural science’s method to the study of the social world. Methodological naturalism has had a bad press at least since the turn of the 20th century when anti-positivists pointed out the unavailability of disinterested observation or objective laws. If Marxism is scientific, neo-Marxists and post-Marxists reason, then Marx must have posited mechanistic, historic-economic laws. Marxists’ explanatory privileging of the economic base vis-a-vis the politico-cultural superstructure must thus be “vulgar materialism” or “economic reductionism”. Marxists, they say, deny human agency.

This book shows exactly why these objections rest on incorrect readings of Marx. It traces the errors to the intellectual terrain of European socialism at the end of the 19th century, a period dominated by the German Social Democratic Party (SPD) and the orthodox Marxism of the 1889 Second International. Capitalist expansion and economic stability after the failed revolutions of 1848 and 1871 saw some leading left theoreticians capitulate to reformism, justified by their claim that Marx had discovered natural laws responsible for capitalism’s inevitable evolution to socialism. The 1917 Bolshevik Revolution was considered a doomed attempt to violate Marxian science by imposing socialism from above. Of course, the subsequent period of capitalist crisis that led to two world wars brought no capitalist collapse and the Second International’s mechanical evolutionism looked increasingly implausible. And the crimes associated with Stalin’s crude materialism would later only add fuel to the revisionists’ fire.

The leading New Left theoreticians of the inter-war and post-war period were obliged to explain what was going on. Their post-empiricist turn away from science was reinforced by the concurrent shift in social theory towards hermeneutics, phenomenology and interpretivism. Educationists will be familiar with the micro-sociology of epistemological radicals (such as Michael F D Young) of the New Sociology of Education. The post-war Keynesian consensus smoothed the way for economic and industrial downplaying in favour of Weberian and neo-Durkheimian analyses. Capitalism’s resilience and educational underachievement could be explained by reference to “reification”, “restricted code”, “habitus”, “hegemony” and the social construction of curricula, race, sexuality, ability, gender and class.

What’s really impressive about this book is that its author uses critical realism to show how reductionist this is. The economic and natural has been reduced to the social, the ontological to the epistemological, and political-economy to bourgeois democracy. There is, at best, a flat ontology conceptualising society as interactions between individuals embedded in a power matrix of intersecting identities with each person in some ways privileged and/or in other ways disadvantaged. This restricts analyses to the individual’s power to define reality and is a form of ontological shyness which restricts reality to empirical phenomena—what humans can experience directly. Banfield recalls Marx’s point that if appearance was all that there was to reality (the epistemic fallacy), there would be no need for human beings to practise science at all. Indeed, scientific observation is praxis-dependent because scientists are engaging in a social activity which seeks to understand the underlying properties of objects or mechanisms which generate the appearance of empirical patterns.

The book’s achievement relies upon critical realism’s depth ontology, the detail of which cannot be reproduced here but which is beautifully explicated. Banfield absolves the Marxist sociology of education of crude materialism by appeal to Marxian method, elaborated by reference to critical realism’s “stratification” and “emergence”. Properties and powers can emerge from reality’s underlying strata but are not reducible to them. People’s liabilities and powers are not determined by their biology, for example. Human reasons, intentions and consciousness emerge from, but are not reducible to, neurophysiological matter. Similarly, education systems emerge from an economic base but are not reducible to it. The point is that systems rooted in any historically particular relations and forces of production emerge with particular properties, tendencies and powers. This is certainly not economic reductionism or vulgar materialism. These forces are determining but not determinist and their potentials can illuminate the relationship between education, society and the material world.

Ultimately the book aims at conceptual uncluttering to make way for revolutionising educational practice. It makes clear that historical materialism doesn’t overlook culture or agency but rather takes capitalist structural relations to be both power-limiting and power-conferring. Contradiction arises out of an antagonistic social relation between the class which possesses the material tools to extract surplus value from production, and the working class who lack those means. The interests of profitability pressure capitalists to lower wages and use more efficient technology, while the interests of subsistence pressure workers to demand wage increases. Historical materialism can be understood within an emergent, stratified ontology which explains why workers’ biological need for material well-being takes priority over loyalty to existing social relations. In other words, productive forces have material limits (epistemological, biological, technological and natural) that restrict possibilities in terms of social relations (a relation that doesn’t work the other way round). Those who accuse Marx of economic reductionism fail to understand that outlining agency’s shape is not eliminating it. Insisting on the explanatory primacy of the economic merely specifies the particular form agency takes. Class is not an identity; it is an objective relation and therefore working class power takes the collective shape of industrial action (given the power of labour withdrawal to adversely affect profits). Societal transformation is not guaranteed but rather contingent upon political organisation and cultural processes—whether or not for example, the working class achieves sufficient class consciousness collectively to advance its interests at the expense of the capitalist class.

Therein lies the role of educators as mediators in class struggle, leading and learning from the development of social movements. It is their job, in other words, to join with other activists to ensure that revolutionary capacities and collective subjectivity are brought into being through struggle.

This is a ground-making book in the sociology of education. Hopefully, it will open up the field to a long overdue, serious engagement with classical Marxism. In my view, critical realism lacks historical materialism’s explanatory power. But, in this excellent book, the author has certainly shown the former’s potential for socialist teachers, researchers and students who want to defend the role of ­education in revolution.

Gail Edwards is researcher and lecturer in education at Newcastle University, UK, having formerly been a schoolteacher. She is a revolutionary socialist and member of the SWP.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca   Lun 5 Sep à 9:06

Homme libre toujours tu chériras la mer ! La mer est ton miroir ; tu contemples ton âme Dans le déroulement infini de la lame, Et ton esprit n'est pas un gouffre moins amer.
Charles Baudelaire, XIV Spleen et Idéal, Les fleurs du mal

--------------------------------------------------------------

Le courage, c'est d'accepter les conditions nouvelles que la vie fait à la science et à l'an, d'accueillir, d'explorer la complexité presque infinie des faits et des détails, et cependant d'éclairer cette réalité énorme et confuse par des idées générales, de l'organiser et de la soulever par la beauté sacrée des formes et des rythmes.

Jean JAURÈS, Extrait du Discours à la Jeunesse, Albi 1903

--------------------------------------------------------

Quand je pense au mot tendresse je pense aux hommes moi. Avec les femmes on a de la passion, de la patience, et puis des remords. Mais la tendresse est un mot qui s'applique infiniment plus aux hommes, parce que la tendresse est un jeu égalitaire, entre deux pôles qui sont à égalité.
Brel parle

---------------------------------------------------------------

Un homme cruel est léger, riche, infiniment mystérieux. .. Imprévisible. Il vous fait passer par toutes les couleurs de l'arc-en-ciel et on s'étonne de découvrir chaque fois de nouvelles souffrances, de nouveaux délices de souffrance et d'amour. Alors qu'on finit par en vouloir à un homme à qui on peut toujours faire confiance. ..
Les hommes cruels ne courent pas les rues de Katherine Pancol

---------------------------------------------------------------

’art est une tentative pour transporter dans une quantité finie de matière modelée par l’homme une image de la beauté infinie de l’univers entier. Si la tentative est réussie, cette portion de matière ne doit pas cacher l’univers, mais au contraire en révéler la réalité tout autour.
Attente de Dieu
Simone Weil

--------------------------------------------------------------

Toujours elle me fut chère cette colline solitaire et cette haie qui dérobe au regard tant de pans de l'extrême horizon. Mais demeurant assis et contemplant, au-delà d'elle, dans ma pensée j'invente des espaces illimités, des silences surhumains et une quiétude profonde ; où peu s'en faut que le coeur ne s'épouvante. Et comme j'entends le vent bruire dans ces feuillages, je vais comparant ce silence infini à cette voix : en moi reviennent l'éternel, et les saisons mortes et la présente qui vit, et sa sonorité. Ainsi, dans cette immensité, se noie ma pensée : et le naufrage m'est doux dans cette mer.
L'Infini de Leopardi

-------------------------------------------------------------

Les vastes horizons, la mer infinie, les montagnes gigantesques, surtout lorsque tout cela est baigné de l'air pur et doré du Midi, tout cela vous mène droit à la contemplation, et rien mieux que la contemplation ne vous éloigne du travail.
Le Bagnard de l'Opéra (1868), Alexandre Dumas, éd. Magnard, coll. Classiques & Contemporains, 2001 (ISBN 978-2-210-75424-9), 1. Le forçat, p. 9

-------------------------------------------------------------

On est tous divisés, on est intérieurement plusieurs personnes contradictoires qui se combattent ou dont les intérêts se contredisent, on est tous amenés à jouer des rôles qui en définitive sont des facettes d'une vérité unique qu'on passe son temps à intérioriser, à travestir, à protéger du regard d'autrui et finalement à trahir, parce qu'on a honte de s'avouer aussi complexe, pluriel, tiraillé, contradictoire et donc essentiellement infini, alors que c'est précisément notre force.
L'amour et les forêts
Eric Reinhardt

--------------------------------------------------------------

Les moments difficiles, si on les vit à deux, ont infiniment plus de valeur que les moments tranquilles que l’on vivrait tout seul.
Aux anges de Francis Dannemark

-------------------------------------------------------------

Le mot infini, comme les mots Dieu, esprit et quelques autres expressions, dont les équivalents existent dans toutes les langues, est non pas l'expression d'une idée, mais l'expression d'un effort vers cette idée.

Eurêka : Essai sur l'univers matériel et spirituel de Edgar Allan Poe
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca   Lun 5 Sep à 9:06

Nos océans sont en train de s’épuiser, et selon d’alarmants rapports, d’immenses zones dépourvues de toute vie s'étendent dans le Pacifique. Mais l’espoir gagne aussi du terrain: l’année dernière a vu la création de plus de zones protégées que jamais auparavant!

Cette semaine, nous pouvons décider qui l’emporte, de la sauvegarde ou du sauve-qui-peut. Pour les scientifiques, protéger 30% de nos océans serait suffisant pour permettre au reste de se régénérer -- et c’est précisément ce plan qui est à l'ordre du jour d'une session du Congrès mondial de la Nature qui commence aujourd'hui!

Des pays où les lobbies de la pêche sont puissants, comme le Japon, s’opposent à ce plan, et il nous revient de les contrecarrer avec toute la puissance du pouvoir citoyen. C’est peut-être l’heure de vérité pour nos océans -- envoyons un million de voix pour les sauver, directement au coeur du sommet:

Les océans fournissent la moitié de l’oxygène que nous respirons, mais la surpêche, le changement climatique et la pollution sont en train de tuer la source de toute vie sur Terre. Si nous n’agissons pas maintenant, notre voracité pourrait nous conduire tout droit à la plus grave extinction de masse des dernières 55 millions d’années.

180 gouvernements sont sur le point de participer à un vote sur l'établissement d'un nouvel objectif international: protéger 30% de nos océans d’ici à 2030. Le résultat de ce vote ne sera pas contraignant, mais il est le socle de tout accord ayant force de loi.

L’année dernière, on a vu la création de plus de réserves marines que jamais dans l’histoire à la suite d’imposantes mobilisations citoyennes. Nous savons que nos voix comptent. Rassemblons-nous maintenant afin d’éviter que nos océans rendent leur dernier souffle:

Ils recouvrent 71% de notre planète, sont le refuge de milliers d’espèces que nous n’avons pas encore découvertes et sont la source de toute vie sur Terre. Nos océans sont autant de miracles et de merveilles. Ils sont de plus tellement puissants qu’ils peuvent se régénérer des ravages causés par l’homme - mais pour cela nous devons donner une chance de survie au coeur qui fait battre notre planète. Et c’est ce cadeau que notre mouvement peut lui offrir si nous nous rassemblons.

Avec espoir et détermination,

Dalia, Nell, Danny, Lisa, Ari, Diego, Fatima, Alice et toute l’équipe d’Avaaz

POUR PLUS D’INFORMATIONS:

Le plus grand congrès sur la protection de la nature s'ouvre jeudi à Hawaii (Tahiti Infos)
http://www.tahiti-infos.com/Le-plus-grand-congres-sur-la-protection-de-la-nature-s-ouvre-jeudi-a-Hawaii_a152358.html

Accroître l’étendue des Aires marines protégées pour assurer l’efficacité de la conservation de la biodiversité (IUCN)
https://portals.iucn.org/congress/fr/motion/053

Obama crée la plus grande réserve marine du monde à Hawaii (Le Presse)
http://www.lapresse.ca/environnement/especes-menacees/201608/26/01-5014311-obama-cree-la-plus-grande-reserve-marine-du-monde-a-hawaii.php

Protéger 30% des océans apporterait de multiples bénéfices (Pew, en anglais)
http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/analysis/2016/03/21/protecting-30-percent-of-the-ocean-brings-multiple-benefits

Un plan réaliste pour sauver l’océan (National Geographic, en anglais)
http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/08/hope-spots-an-actionable-plan-to-save-the-ocean/
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
yanis la chouette



Nombre de messages : 4322
Localisation : http://yanis.tignard.free.fr
Date d'inscription : 12/11/2005

MessageSujet: Re: la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca   Mar 13 Sep à 10:11

Toulouse, le 13 Septembre 2016

"Lettre vers tous les Croyants, les Laics, les Athées et Indiférents sans distinction de sexes et d'appartenance"

"A travers l'histoire, il y a tout ces regards qui porte sur l'espérance d'une terre bénite où résonne la paix et l'harmonie si désireuse dans le cœur de l'Homme. Certains ont construit et d'autres ont détruit... Les Femmes n'eurent pas dans un premier temps à se soucier de leur image, telle des lionnes, elles étaient libre de se soumettre ou de se dérober à l'acte naturel de la Nature et de ses lois. Mais voilà; nous avons voulu une femme unique dans sa présentation et son comportement: La diversité lui fut enlevé et l'Homme perdit son statut d'être suprême de Dieu. Les Hyènes, les lions et les Éléphants devint les inspirateurs de l'évolution humaine, plus nous apprenons à observer ce qui reste de sauvage dans la nature, nous voyions que nous avons voulu supprimer ces codes d'honneurs... Ce qui était preuve de charité fut transformé en faiblesse ! Le lion qui élevait les fils de ses frères, ce lion là fut tué par les Hommes et ceux qui prirent sa défense furent exilés du cœur des femmes... On les transforma pour les soustraire à leurs regards... Trouvé vous cela juste mesdames d'être puni pour un acte de bonté à l'égard de ce lion qui adopta les orphelins de ces crimes et qui honoré les dettes des Dames Lionnes à l'égard de Yahvé, Dieu, Allah, Vishnou ou Éternel est l’Éternel. Oui malgré mon sens laïque, je crois au courage de la Charité et de la Valeur malgré tout j'ai perdu ma naïveté devant le Lâche, le Traitre, l’Envieux et la Haine. J'aime le regard tel le lion qui protège son territoire, Sa Lionne et Son Peuple et qui n'ose pas cacher son admiration devant les singes et les éléphants imprégné de sagesse et de Bonté... Le Courage de la Girafe, la Hargne de la Hyène, l'endurance du Serpent, la moquerie du Scorpion et les enseignements de la Mouche. Les Mouches indiquent l'eau et sont des reversoirs aussi utile que le Chameau et le Cheval... Les hirondelles qui faisait sourire les Femmes et les Enfants; Et malgré la Cruauté du Temps, il y avait toujours une place pour la valeur du Courage et du charitable... Voilà à partir de quoi et selon les percepts de Gordon Pacha et l’Enseignement de l’Écoute du Temps et de La Nature nous pouvons reconstruire Alep, Petra et tous ces Oasis qui faisait les charmes de nos querelles de Commerçants, de Patriarches et de Familles. Nous ne pourrons jamais éviter des querelles ou des discordes de Voisinages, mais Sauvegarder Notre Honneur, ça sera mon premier engagement d'Homme contre l'Esclavage, le Viol, la Torture, La Faim, La soif et pour l'équilibre, le partage, la manifestation, l'égalité, de réunion et de gréve."

Ecrit de
TAY
La chouette effraie.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.atelier-yannistignard.com
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca   Aujourd'hui à 19:11

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
la Mer de Chine, ses guerres et Y'becca
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Les JO en Chine
» Wow, en Chine.
» CHINE : UNE MAMAN OURS SE TUE AVEC SON BEBE!
» Paniers vapeur aux crevettes ( Chine)
» Finir son assiette en Chine

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
La.cinquieme.République :: La.cinquieme.République-
Sauter vers: